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In 30 days you can be a joggler too

After skipping my short recovery run on Monday, I had a good workout yesterday. I did 7 miles of joggling on the treadmill in just over 50 minutes. The first two miles were pretty tough but then it got significantly easier. I listened to an episode of Penn Jillette’s radio show which took my mind off any slight pains. That guy cracks me up. And he’s a juggler! I doubt he’s a joggler though. He doesn’t look like much of a runner.

Yesterday also marked the beginning of a 30-day experiment that my wife and I are conducting. Everyday for 30 days we are going to take a walk together. I figure it will be good to spend some time with her and it’ll be good recovery work for my legs. The hardest part will be trying to work in a 20 minute walk everyday. Between marathon joggling training, blog writing, and everything else I’ve got going on, it will be a challenge. But life is for living. It just means I’ll watch less TV and that’s a good thing. I hope she won’t mind if I do a little “woggling”.

You should try a 30-day experiment yourself. According to Steve Pavlina it goes like this. Figure out something you’d like to learn, get good at, or just accomplish. Some simple task. Then commit to doing it for 30 days in a row. You only have to do it for 30 days. After that, you can just stop. But for 30 days, you have to do it. This would be a perfect experiment for learning to juggle. Check out the ‘snap’ juggling method in my links or the Jim show method. Then commit to juggling at least 10 minutes everyday for 30 days. I’m sure you will find that after the experiment, you will be a much better juggler. Or you’ll hate it and never want to try juggling again. Either way you will have learned something about yourself.

This Post Has 5 Comments
  1. […] Which means I made it about 88.4% of my goal. This seems good enough to me. Sure there were times when I could’ve ran instead of playing basketball or volleyball. Or I could’ve spent those 30 days of walking with my wife, instead joggling by myself. But life would’ve been just a little less fun. When you’re training for a marathon, you try to live up to your schedule. Just forgive yourself if you don’t quite make it. No one knows exactly the right formula for you anyway. 484 miles feels pretty good to me. […]

  2. […] Which means I made it about 88.4% of my goal. This seems good enough to me. Sure there were times when I could’ve ran instead of playing basketball or volleyball. Or I could’ve spent those 30 days of walking with my wife, instead joggling by myself. But life would’ve been just a little less fun. When you’re training for a marathon, you try to live up to your schedule. Just forgive yourself if you don’t quite make it. No one knows exactly the right formula for you anyway. 484 miles feels pretty good to me. […]

  3. […] Which means I made it about 88.4% of my goal. This seems good enough to me. Sure there were times when I could’ve ran instead of playing basketball or volleyball. Or I could’ve spent those 30 days of walking with my wife, instead joggling by myself. But life would’ve been just a little less fun. When you’re training for a marathon, you try to live up to your schedule. Just forgive yourself if you don’t quite make it. No one knows exactly the right formula for you anyway. 484 miles feels pretty good to me. […]

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